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The beauty of Ojika

The cultural landscape of the Ojika island group has been designated as an Important Cultural Landscape by the Japanese national government. Much of the landscape remains as it has done for centuries, and so does the warmth and the kindness of the people who live there.

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Candidates for a world heritage

Former Nokubi Church Former Nokubi Church
Former Nokubi Church

Six villages within the Ojika island group have been designated as an Important Cultural Landscape by the Japanese national government. From the old wooden houses and simple fishing villages of the Fuefuki district to the pine forests of the Yanagi district, time feels as though it has stood still.
Foreign tourists value Ojika as highly as Japanese visitors do. Visitors from abroad especially enjoy the family-like hospitality and traditional Japanese way of life found within the island’s minpaku (similar to a bed-and-breakfast). It is not only the landscape in Ojika which remains much as it has done for centuries, but also the warmth and the kindness of the people who live there.
Several years after the last group of residents left Nozaki and the island became deserted, Ojika town asked whether they could receive the church, which had fallen into ruin, from the Archdiocese of Nagasaki free of charge. The Archdiocese agreed, and Ojika town then arranged the necessary repair, conservation and construction work. In the words of Yokoyama Kouzou (who runs a printing company within an old house from the Edo period located in the Fuefuki district of Ojika island), "The church is connected to the history of Ojika island. It is not separate from it".